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Reena Gulati Blog

Purchasing real estate in New York can be an exhilarating but potentially daunting experience. The process involves considering more than just the property's purchase price. As a savvy homebuyer, it's essential to be aware of the hidden costs associated with buying real estate in New York City to avoid unexpected financial surprises. In this blog, we'll explore some of these expenses and provide valuable insights to help you make informed decisions.

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When purchasing real estate in a community with a homeowner’s association (“HOA”), the buyer must assess these fees in estimating the cost of maintaining their property. Such a fee does not exist for single-family homes outside such communities. The HOA fee is mandatory. Once you acquire the property in the homeowner’s association, you are automatically a member of the association and subject to the HOA fee and/or assessments.

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Buying a co-op in New York City can be a daunting experience. However, if you are prepared and understand the process, it can alleviate some of the anxiety often associated with purchasing a co-op. There are a few things to keep in mind, depending on whether you are a buyer or a seller of a co-op.

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What is a shared meter condition? It is when the utility meter that measures gas and electric or steam provided to a tenant also includes common areas that are the responsibility of the owner but are being billed on the tenant’s meter. This is in contravention of the current New York Shared Meter Law. Shared meter conditions can arise accidentally or intentionally. Either way, they are not permissible. The shared meter condition must be eliminated, or the meter must be placed in the name of the owner/landlord and the owner will remain responsible for all charges. This law cannot be waived by the tenant, owner, or utility company. Shared meter conditions are contrary to public policy.

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The short answer is yes but it is not a definitive answer. If the estate of the decedent will take a long time to go through probate, if there is a will or in the absence of a will, the administration of the decedent’s estate will be protracted due to disputes within the estate, such as a will contest or the objection to the appointment of a nominated Executor for fear that that the nominee is unfit for the job or fails to qualify, a Preliminary Executor can be appointed.

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